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Capturing Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir win Gold for Canada in Vancouver was definitely one of the highlights of my Olympic experience.  They were outstanding and amazing to shoot!!  I used my Nikon D3s with Nikon 200-400mm lens (the perfect zoom to shoot the figure skating).  I was able to shoot at 3200ISO which allowed me to exposure at f/5.6 at 1/1250sec.

 

Wishing you both good luck in Sochi!!!

Record the Energy of the Moment at its Greatest Potential

When people ask me what to shoot for in a sports image, I show them a photograph and explain that in most cases, it is all about freezing the peak of the action, the height of the jump, the maximum edge... ultimately recording the energy of the moment at its greatest potential.

 

Focus and Composition

One of the keys is to a fantastic shot is to focus on the eyes of the athlete. There is so much emotion, intensity and concentration that can be told through the eyes. If I cannot see the eyes then I pick another key point on the athlete to focus on. I set my Nikon to AF-C (Auto-Focus Continuous Mode) so I don’t miss the shot if the camera isn’t sure if the subject is in focus or not. I then pre-determine what I want my composition to look like. Whether I want empty space to one side of the image to give the sense that the athlete is moving in that direction, or space below the athlete going off a jump to give the sense of height, I picture how I want the final image to look. I pick a focus point where I want the subject to be to match the composition, and then follow the athlete, holding the trigger down lightly to keep autofocusing. When the subject is at his/her peak of action, I fire away and usually hold the button down for a few extra frames while following through smoothly to make sure I don’t get camera shake. I keep a good grip on my camera and lens, and use dynamic pressure by pulling slightly on my lens while pushing the butt of the camera with my other hand. I usually have VR (Vibration Reduction) turned on for sports images to minimize any potential camera vibrations and cre- ate the sharpest image possible. You can also use a tripod or monopod to help keep your camera steady.

Shooting the Olympics or any action sporting event can be intense, but settle in and take the time to get creative.  Always be thinking of ways to capture the subject in a "different," artistic or illustrative way.  In my feature image above I used the multiple exposure feature on my Nikon to create an interesting effect.  Using a tighter than normal crop with negative space, leading lines or using a lens like a fisheye to create a different perspective are all ways that I have mindfully expanded my photographic toolbox.   Other cools effects can be created by slowing down your shutter speed and creating movement, trying a pan shot or zooming your lens while shooting.  Practice some of these effects when the athletes are doing their training runs so you can get really creative during the big race with confidence.

Use a FAST Shutter Speed

When trying to freeze the action and create blurr-free images with longer lenses, I try to shoot at a shutter speed of at least 1/500 second and optimally about 1/2000 of a second for most sports. Generally I recommend that photographers use manual metering (my preference) or shutter speed priority, where you set the ISO and the shutter speed and the camera adjusts the f/stop automatically. This is a quick and easy way to shoot sports and you can use your exposure compensation controls to adjust to the light conditions if necessary. This is especially helpful when shooting near white snow and ice which might throw off your meter as it tries to adjust between the bright background and darker subject. Turn image review on so that you can evaluate your images often, ensure that your whites aren’t blown out, and zoom in to make sure that your image is razor sharp.
 

Push the High ISO Capabilities of Your Camera to the Limit

Another cool option on many new cameras is Auto-ISO. This feature enables you to set your desired shutter speed and aperture and the camera will adjust the ISO or sensitivity of your sensor to get a correct exposure. Most of the newer cameras have phenomenal high ISO capabilities which make getting great sports images easier than ever, especially at indoor venues. Experiment with the ISO settings on your camera and evaluate your results. The higher the ISO the more noise or grain you will get, so use it, but use it mindfully. Many of my indoor shots from the Vancouver 2010 Olympics were shot at 3200 or 4000 ISO (like my Figure Skater image above, shot with my Nikon D3s and 600mm lens: f/7.1 at 1/1000sec at 3200ISO ) and I have enlarged them to 24x36 inches with very little grain and remarkable results.

Learn how to enhance your landscape images and more with Nikon Capture NX2 Software.  Edit directly to your NEF raw files using colour control points.

[vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_column_text]Landscapes are one of my favourite summer/fall subjects. Here are 10 of my Top Tips to help you get better landscape images. Click on each of the images below to see the info on the Gear and Exposure Settings I used to create them. The Feature Image: "An Ocean of Romance" was shot at Seal Rocks Beach, Australia on my Nikon D3 with 24-70mm f/2.8G lens,  f/13 at 1/2 second, ISO 400.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/1"][vc_row_inner css=".vc_custom_1432529439181{padding-top: 30px !important;padding-bottom: 30px !important;background-color: #eeeeee !important;}"][vc_column_inner el_class="" width="1/1"][vc_column_text]

1 - Shoot the "Sweet Light"

Early Morning or Late Evening

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner el_class="" width="2/3"][vc_column_text]Good lighting is a key element to getting an outstanding photograph. When shooting landscapes the quality of light is generally better in the early morning and late evening because the light is lower and warmer. This time of day will generally create more pleasing shadows, contrast and texture along with more vibrant colours in your imagery. Avoid shooting around noon when sun is generally harshest and flattest.

Early morning may bring fog, mist on the water and maybe even some wildlife to complement your landscape image. Mornings generally have less haze and less wind and that might help you get a clearer shot. Sunsets can be epic and offer wonderful lighting opportunities as well like my image "Fiery Skies over Three Sisters Mountains" (right) where I capture the alpenglow on the mountains with moody clouds and fiery red skies above.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner el_class="" width="1/3"][vc_single_image image="3331" css_animation="appear" alignment="center" img_link_large="yes" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]

Fiery Skies over Three Sisters Mountain - Nikon D3X with Nikon 24-70mm lens | f/10 at 1/125 sec

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2 - Get to Know Your Gear and Settings

Achieve Excellence In-Camera

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner el_id=""][vc_column_inner el_class="" width="2/3"][vc_column_text]Get to know your equipment, when you get a new camera or piece of gear test out your settings and find out what works best for you.  My favourite camera to shoot landscapes with is my Nikon D800E because of the incredible detail I can capture at 36 megapixels.  Here are some settings that I use to get fantastic results in-camera and save me a ton of time editing later:

First of all set your camera to shoot RAW so that you can record the full capabilities of your camera.  You can use Nikon View NX2 or your proprietary camera manufacturer's software to retain and adjust these settings later on the computer.

Next, adjust your in-camera Picture Control Settings and crank up the saturation, sharpness and sometimes even the contrast depending on my subject. This immediately makes a HUGE difference in most landscape images and adds some extra sizzle to those brilliant summer and fall colours.

When shooting I generally meter for the intensity in the sky and expose for the highlights.  Unlike film, there is more exposure latitude in the shadows of a digital file and and you can bring out that detail with software later. I usually set my highlights to flash in my camera display settings.  I look for a few specular highlights when evaluating my images and make sure no light areas where I want detail are blown out.  Then I know that I have pushed the Dynamic Range of my image to the limit.

Nikon’s D-Lighting setting also works great to get more detail in the mid-tone to shadow area. I usually leave the D-Lighting set on low or normal. If you don’t have this feature you can try reducing the contrast when shooting in difficult light and with dark contrasting subjects.

Finally, noise can be an issue on most cameras at ISO sensitivities over 800 ISO. In hand-held situations where you are shooting at a higher ISO set your High ISO Noise Reduction settings to Low or whatever setting works best for your camera.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner el_class="" width="1/3"][vc_single_image image="3279" css_animation="appear" alignment="center" img_link_large="yes" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]

Maui Sunset- Nikon D3X with Nikon 24-70mm lens| f/11 at 1/200 sec | 200 ISO

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Nikon D800E - My 1st Choice for Landscape Shooting

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Adjust Your Saturation, Contrast and Sharpness Using Nikon's PICTURE CONTROL SETTINGS

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3 - Use Your Polarizer Sparingly

Only in Situations where you want to Reduce Glare or Reflection

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner el_id=""][vc_column_inner el_class="" width="2/3"][vc_column_text]I often see photographers overusing their Circular Polar Polarizing filter when out shooting landscapes by leaving it on their camera all of the time.  The benefits of a polarizer are that they can reduce glare or reflections and can darken your sky when used correctly. However you also lose 2 stops of light which can be a major disadvantage especially if your shooting hand-held.   They also can produce an uneven darkening effect in the sky on wider angle lenses.

Most newer lenses have very good coatings already which increase contrast and reduce some reflection.  I rarely use a polarizer and have a high quality UV filter on my lens at all times to protect my investment.  If my sky needs to be darkened I use Nikon Capture NX2 or Nik's Viveza to darken the sky perfectly and evenly with colour control points.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner el_class="" width="1/3"][vc_single_image image="3282" css_animation="appear" alignment="center" img_link_large="yes" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]

Framing this image with the spring flowers helps draw you in to the scene, further enhancing the impact of this landscape. Nikon D3, 14-24mm lens, 1/160 second, f/13, ISO 250

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4 - Bring a Tripod

Slow Down Your Shutter Speed, Shoot In-Camera HDR, Time Lapses + more

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner el_id=""][vc_column_inner el_class="" width="2/3"][vc_column_text]Carrying a tripod everywhere can be painful but it is an indispensable tool when it comes to shooting amazing landscapes. Tripods are a necessity for shooting any slower that 1/30 of a second for even the steadiest hand. They allow you to settle in to your image, adjust composure, shoot, correct and shoot again until the image is perfect

Tripods also assist you to shoot at almost any combination of ISO, Aperture and Shutter speed with great results.  So you can set your ISO to its lowest best setting (least noise) and aperture to the desired depth of field, meter for your sky and let your shutter speed be the adjustable variable to get the correct exposure.

You can also use the tripod to keep your camera still for long exposures like startrails or night shots but also when you want slow down your exposure for movement like I have in this image of Botanical Beach, Victoria, where I dragged the shutter for 1/10 of a second to create the bursting movement in the water.  Instantly after this exposure I shielded the camera and saved it from this rogue wave.

Some new cameras like my Nikon D-800E have the ability to shoot HDR (High Dynamic Range) images right in-camera. It takes more than one image at different exposures and blends them together to expand your dynamic range.  This can be very useful when you have a brighter sky and darker foreground and you want to have detail in both.   For more instruction on HDR setup see my blog article on In-Camera HDR HERE.

Finally many new cameras have the ability to shoot time lapses right in-camera.  These can look incredible and are worth experimenting with.  Capture an entire one hour sunset in 20 seconds with all of the saturation and still techniques mentioned in this article.  For best results prefocus and then set focus to manual and exposure setting to aperture priority so that you get nice smooth video.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner el_class="" width="1/3"][vc_single_image image="3323" css_animation="appear" alignment="center" img_link_large="yes" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]

Nikon D3 with 24-70mm lens at f/22 at 1/10 sec | 100 ISO

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Manfrotto - My Tripod of Choice

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5 - Reduce Vibrations

This Ensures Your Images are Perfectly Sharp

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner el_id=""][vc_column_inner el_class="" width="2/3"][vc_column_text]I have found that the higher the megapixels of the camera you are using the greater the likelihood of vibrations or camera-shake showing up in your images because there is so much more detail to work with.  Additionally the longer the lens focal length the more possibility of shake.

In order to reduce vibrations when trying to capture the perfect landscape shot I would use a tripod but also reduce vibrations made when you press the trigger by using a cable release or wireless remote like my favourite Nikon WR-R10 + WR-A10 Wireless Remote Adapter shown (right).  You can also use the built-in exposure delay mode available in most new camera settings.

If your lens has a VR (vibration reduction) function than turn it on in NORMAL mode for sharper images.  VR may have erratic results in certain instances that have moving elements like water.  Review your images, zoom in to 100% and evaluate if it's making a positive difference.

If you have to shoot hand-held then try to shoot faster than 1/30 of a second with a wide angle lens and 1/250 of a second with any focal length over 70mm.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner el_class="" width="1/3"][vc_single_image image="3326" css_animation="appear" alignment="center" img_link_large="yes" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]

Nikon WR-R10 + WR-A10 Wireless Remote Adapter

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6 - Paint with Light

Create Amazing Night Images

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner el_id=""][vc_column_inner el_class="" width="2/3"][vc_column_text]One of my favourite techniques is to paint a scene with light in the darkness. You will have to put your camera on a tripod and use a long exposure while painting the subject with different light sources like flashlights, glow sticks, LED’s, coloured gels, flash etc. This technique will help you get dramatic results with vibrant colours and it can be a lot of fun - especially if you share the moment with friends and get them involved.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]I would suggest starting with a 20 or 30 second exposure with your camera on a tripod at 100-250 ISO.  Set your aperture depending on the depth of field you want to achieve.  I suggest f/8 to begin.  I exposed the image (right) for 180 seconds using a special cable release and used the Princeton Tec headlamp below to paint the waves with light in a swirling pattern while flashing my Nikon Speedlight several times at full power to the left of the image to illuminate the scene.[/vc_column_text][vc_single_image image="3345" css_animation="appear" alignment="center" img_link_large="yes" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full"][vc_column_text]

Princeton Tec Apex Headlamp and Nikon SB-910 Speedlight

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Mystical Moon Rise Over Botanical Beach - Nikon D3 with 24-70mm lens | f/8 at 180sec | 800ISO

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Coloured Gels

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7 - Use White Balance

A Powerful and Non-Destructive Filter

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner el_id=""][vc_column_inner el_class="" width="1/1"][vc_column_text]I often use my white balance settings as “lens filters” to manually adjust my white balance to warm or cool my landscape images which can enhance the feeling and mood. I can create a nice warmth by setting the camera to “cloudy” white balance instead of “daylight”. If you want to go even warmer, use the “shade” setting. You can use this technique to get a really warm sunrise or sunset, or cool down the colour temperature of your image using the “tungsten” or other custom settings. If you are shooting RAW, then you can always change these settings back after the shoot - so you can experiment without fear.

Below you can see the same landscape scene shot with tungsten and cloudy white balance.  I then changed my Picture Control Setting to Monochrome with an Orange Filter to get these very different looks right in-camera.[/vc_column_text][vc_images_carousel images="3278,3277,3276" onclick="link_image" custom_links_target="_self" mode="horizontal" speed="2000" slides_per_view="1" autoplay="yes" img_size="full" hide_pagination_control="yes" wrap="yes"][vc_column_text]

Monochrome, Cloudy and Tungsten White Balance

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8 -Mindfully Frame Your Image

Keep Your Horizon Line Straight

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner el_id=""][vc_column_inner el_class="" width="2/3"][vc_column_text]Creatively framing your images in-camera can add a tremendous impact.  Look for objects like clouds and rocks that naturally give a border/crop to your image and draw you in.  Try making the  focal point of interest off-centre and use the rule of thirds to create a harmonious composition.  You can also try placing the horizon line a third of the way down from the top or bottom of the frame in stead of in the middle.

Creatively framing your images in-camera can add a tremendous impact.  Look for objects like clouds and rocks that naturally give a border/crop to your image and draw you in.  Try making the  focal point of interest off-centre and use the rule of thirds to create a harmonious composition.  You can also try placing the horizon line a third of the way down from the top or bottom of the frame in stead of in the middle.

In order to get nice straight horizon lines in my photos, I love using the “virtual horizon” and “grid view” features on my Nikon cameras. These really help to get that perfectly straight horizon line. I always leave grid view turned on which shows a grid in my viewfinder display.  This is really helpful to align with any horizon line and with composition as well.  I also use a tool called virtual horizon to see my camera level in live-view mode on the display screen at the back of my camera.  If your on a tripod or the camera is low, live-view is a great tool to help compose and align your frame.  My favourite setting is to set the function button on my Nikon D800E and D4 to show me my camera virtual horizon levels through the viewfinder.  With this feature I can switch from exposure meter to vertical and horizontal camera alignment meter and get perfectly straight horizons with ease.

If your camera doesn't have these features try an inexpensive bubble level that can mount to your camera hotshoe.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner el_class="" width="1/3"][vc_single_image image="3322" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full" alignment="center" img_link_large="yes" css_animation="appear"][vc_column_text]

I framed this sunset image with the clouds and grass. Vermillion Lake Sunset - Nikon D3X with Nikon 24-70mm lens| f/9 at 1/100 sec | 250 ISO

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Virtual Horizon In-Camera Level

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9 - Create Depth

Using Colour, Contrast + Foreground / Middleground / Background in Your Shots

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner el_id=""][vc_column_inner el_class="" width="2/3"][vc_column_text]Depth is a another key ingredient of many great landscape images. We can create depth by colour contrast like the cool water and warm bright flowers in the image (right).  Lighting choice and the use of highlights and shadows also create depth in any landscape. For Black and White images we can also create depth with the use of contrast, shapes and textures.

Depth of perspective can be create by establishing a distict foreground, middleground and background in your images.  In order to have these elements all in focus you will want to shoot with plenty of depth of field.   However a lot of photographers have the misconception that you should shoot at f/22 or your maximum aperture to get the best images.  It is true that the higher the f-stop the more depth of field you get but most lenses will produce a much softer and poorer image at these high apertures.  I usually shoot between f/8 and f/13 to get the best combination of depth of field and sharpness.  Test out your lens and see for yourself what apertures it performs best at.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner el_class="" width="1/3"][vc_single_image image="3324" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full" alignment="center" img_link_large="yes" css_animation="appear"][vc_column_text]

Sunshine Meadows in Bloom - Nikon D2X with 17-35mm lens | f/8 at 250 sec | 100 ISO

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10 - Don’t Pack Up Too Early

When the Sun Goes Down Your Camera Sees More than You Do

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][vc_row_inner el_id=""][vc_column_inner el_class="" width="2/3"][vc_column_text]Many photographers pack up and head home right after the sun goes down.  However I have found that sometimes magic starts to happen 10 minutes or so after the sun sets and the real powerful colours in the sky begin to display.  You may see bright pink/red hues emerge and if you have some interesting clouds your sky may become electric!

Meter for the sky and allow your foreground to turn to a silhouette or illuminate it with flash or other mixed light sources.  Eventually the light in the sky will dull and the overall image exposure will become more even.  Stick it out a little longer, set up your tripod if you haven’t already, play with your white balance and keep creating.  When it doesn’t look interesting through your eyes anymore the camera can still capture some fantastic colours with a long exposure.  You may be amazed with what you get.  You may even stay out all night.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner el_class="" width="1/3"][vc_single_image image="3283" img_link_target="_self" img_size="full" alignment="center" img_link_large="yes" css_animation="appear"][vc_column_text]

Nikon D2X with 17-35mm lens | f/5.6 at 1/10 sec | 100 ISO

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Nikon Ambassador Program Recognizes the Dedicated Storytellers that Help Move the Photo Industry Forward

New Nikon Program Partners With Leading Photographers to Energize the Industry Through Inspiration, Education And Empowerment

 

MISSISSAUGA, ON (August 20, 2013) – Nikon Canada Inc. today announced the Nikon Ambassador Program, a collective initiative dedicated to recognizing the most influential leaders in modern photography. In a rapidly changing industry, the significance of these admired photographers goes beyond the creation of inspiring imagery; this diverse group of individuals has shown a commitment to empowering photographers with knowledge, providing guidance for the imaging community and a mastery of technology and trends.

“We recognize that our business is constantly changing, and this world class program will help us identify the needs of the working professionals while honouring the best photographers of today," said Amanda Mohammed, Nikon Professional Services Manager, Nikon Canada Inc. “Our Nikon Ambassadors are the voice of the professional community and we highly regard their input and feedback. Their valuable insight will permit us to grow and evolve this segment of the business while inspiring others to pick up a camera and shoot."

 

Responsibilities of the Nikon Ambassador

The core idea behind the Ambassador Program is to create a mutually beneficial collective to help bolster the photo industry and individuals.  While already considered mentors, the Ambassadors will use their experience to empower photographers through education and inspiration. Whether an enthusiast attending an interactive workshop or a seasoned pro learning new techniques, the shared experiences from these select individuals will apply to all levels of photographer. From shooting and managing a studio to social media and running a successful imaging business, the Ambassadors will help to empower a new generation of professionals with the tools and knowledge to succeed.  Additionally, the Ambassadors will work directly with Nikon to communicate the needs of the evolving photo industry such as enhancements in workflow, service and even products.

To be selected as an Ambassador, a photographer must be considered among the most talented and influential visual artists working in the business today. This elite group consists of gifted, spirited storytellers who are admired for their passion, energy and commitment to their craft. The Ambassadors represent a vast array of backgrounds and shooting disciplines that reflect the breadth of professional photographers today; including wedding, portraiture, fashion, wildlife and adventure.

These artists have evolved with Nikon through the years. And, their careers represent a mastery of technology and trends that have had a positive impact on their business. As the realm of digital media continues to expand, these savvy, influential shooters have embraced digital capture and social media to help educate their fans, friends and followers as part of a community.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]Photography is my Life.  I am the third generation of pro photographers in my family, and ever since my earliest memories I have held a camera in my hands.  My first Nikon was my Dad's Nikkormat, as I got older I would covet/borrow his F-801. I saved for years to buy my own Nikon F100, MB-15 vertical grip and 80-200mm sports lens and I never looked back. From Nikon scanners to my first digital camera – the Nikon D1X to now, I have been unwavering in my dedication to Nikon.

Why?  Because I truly believe in Nikon, what they represent, and that they make the best photography gear on the planet. I feel that I have become part of the Nikon family over the years. It's not just the gear, but the people that make up the company and Nikon Professional Services who have enriched my life, given me pro support across the globe, and joined me on the most epic of shoots while truly inspiring me to take my photography higher.  Last year I realized a dream come true when I was honoured by Nikon Canada to receive the very first Nikon D4 in the country. Over the last 10 years I have enjoyed an extraordinary partnership with Nikon Canada as keynote speaker at many of their largest events and as an ambassador of their brand and products. I have made it my passion and pleasure to push their gear to the absolute limit and join them in inspiring others about this wonderful art form – photography!

"I am very honoured to be chosen as a Nikon Ambassador for Canada and to be a part of this new exciting program. I feel truly privileged to be associated with Nikon over the past many years and I look forward to taking this journey to whole new level with such an exceptional group of fellow Nikon Ambassadors Worldwide."

[/vc_column_text][vc_separator][vc_single_image image="3497" css_animation="appear" alignment="center" img_link_large="yes" img_link_target="_self" img_size="600x600"][vc_column_text css_animation="appear"]

"A photograph captures the co-creation of energy between the photographer and subject at the moment the shutter is clicked. Part of the magic of a great photograph is how you feel at that moment. For those of you who haven't had the pleasure, a Nikon D4 purring in your hands feels pretty Awesome!!
If you want to capture this moment with excellence, then you have to be in it.
Play full, put your heart into it and I assure you your images will inspire. "

KRISTIAN BOGNER

Proud to be a Nikon Ambassador

[/vc_column_text][vc_separator][vc_column_text]About Nikon

Nikon, At the Heart of the Image™, is the world leader in digital imaging, precision optics and photo imaging technology and is globally recognized for setting new standards in product design and performance for its award-winning consumer and professional photographic equipment. Nikon Canada distributes consumer and professional digital SLR and HD-SLR cameras, NIKKOR optics, Speedlights and System Accessories; Nikon COOLPIX® compact digital cameras; 35mm film SLR cameras; Nikon software products and Nikon sports and recreational optics as well as the Nikon 1 advanced cameras with interchangeable lens system. In 2012, production of NIKKOR lenses surpassed 75 million, creating a new milestone in Nikon’s heritage of superior optics. At the heart of every Nikon camera is Nikon\'s exclusive EXPEED, EXPEED 2 or EXPEED 3 advanced digital image processing system technologies. All Nikon Canada products are sold through a network of Authorized Nikon Canada Dealers. For more information on Nikon Canada and its products and services or to find an Authorized Nikon Canada Dealer, visit www.nikon.ca.

FULL PRESS RELEASE on Nikon Canada\'s Web Page

Twitterhttp://www.twitter.com/NikonCanada
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NikonCanada
YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/NikonCanada

For more information contact NPS Canada:
Nikon Canada Inc.
905-625-9910
nps@nikon.ca[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Here are a few images I shot while instructing at my 2-day Photographic Rockstar workshop in Toronto last weekend.   Thank you to my amazing group of photography students and to Nikon and Nikon Professional Services for all of your support and help with the event.  We shot our fabulous model, Judith, outside of the University of Toronto in some great locations.  Here I demonstrated lighting using 2 Nikon SB-910 flashes and Firefly Portable Softboxes as well as a portable round reflector.  Later we did an indoor product shoot and the students learned how to paint any subject with light.

 

I photographed these images from my Hotel Room staying at the amazing Tower Club at LeBua in Bangkok where they filmed Hangover II.  I used the new In-Camera HDR feature on my Nikon D800E with Nikon 14-24mm lens to extend my dynamic range and extend the length of my exposure so that I could get some interesting movement in the ships.  I set my camera to TIF (could use jpg also) because this feature does not work in RAW.  This is because the camera is actually taking two photographs and combining them together.

 

 

Exposure: f/8 at 13 seconds - ISO 100.

 

HDR (high dynamic range)

HDR MODE: ON (series)

EXPOSURE DIFFERENTIAL: 3EV Stops

SMOOTHING: Normal

 

Picture Control Settings (Standard Profile)

Sharpening: 7

Contrast: 0

Brightness: 0

Saturation: Full

Hue: 0

 

Shooting outdoors can give you studio-like effects with some simple tools and techniques.  Similar to landscapes try to shoot in morning or evening light when the light is lower and warmer.  Position the sunlight behind your model and bounce light back into the face with a silver or white reflector or even a white piece of cardboard or tin foil.  This will soften the sunlight so they aren’t as squinty and will give you nice balanced light on the face while the sun provides a great hair light from behind and helps separate your subject from the background.

You can also use flash to fill in the front of the subject.  I use my Nikon SB-910 flash on camera or off camera at about 45 degrees to fill in or give some direction of light to the subject.  This works especially well at sunset when there are brilliant colours or just after the sun has gone down when flash becomes more powerful relative to the sunlight.  Meter and expose for the background and light your subject with your flash.  Try softening your light source with a small softbox or by shooting through some translucent material.  If you need more power increase your ISO settings.  For instance if you increase the ISO on your camera from 100 ISO to 400 ISO your flash essentially becomes 4 times as powerful.

These are just a few ideas to get you started with your outdoor fashion/portrait shoots! Have any great outdoor lighting tips of your own to share? Please comment below, I would love to hear how you get your great outdoor shots!

[image caption="Shot with only one silver reflector reflecting the sun early morning on a rooftop."]https://kristianbogner.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/BOGNER_9993.jpg[/image]

[image caption="I shot this with one Nikon SB-900 Flash off Camera and exposed for the Sunset."]https://kristianbogner.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/BOGNER_DSC1401x.jpg[/image]

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