fbpx

"Here are a few of my best images of Patrick Chan from from the Vancouver Olympics.  I am always amazed by the height and amplitude of his jumps.  In of the images he looks like he's flying!!  Congratulations on the Silver Medal at Sochi Patrick."

 

Visualize the Final Image before you Click

Like an Olympic athlete who visualizes their entire routine or event, I am a strong believer in visualizing the final image before you click the shutter. I see the image in a very final form, the look I want, including any treatments, filters or effects I may add in post processing.

I may even visualize the image cropped as it may appear in the final brochure, magazine or canvas fine art piece. I call this “shooting with the end result in mind” and I find that this gives me greater clarity that allows me to execute the shot more effectively, which translates into a much better final image. I look at it as “Excellence in, Excellence Out.”

I always tell my Photographic Rockstar - Photography Workshop Students "The Bigger the Why, The Smaller the How!"  When I know a Canadian is up, I raise my game as well, and always come up with my best shots of the day!  Why?  I believe its because I make the stakes in my mind bigger, I take the mindset that I must get the shot - that I have to create something incredible... and with that attitude I usually do!

 

One of the image I was most proud of at the Vancouver Olympics was this one, where I was able to capture the Canadian Bobsled perfectly over the Olympic rings.  If any of you have tried to shoot bobsled, and the sheer speed of it, you would understand that its a really hard shot to get... those sleds move FAST!!!  I had to shoot with a whopping 8000ISO on my Nikon D3s at f/4 at 1/3200sec to capture this moment in time.  Its so exciting that new advancements in photography equipment and high ISO capabilities have made these incredible shots possible today.

 

I was also extra honoured to be able to capture some images of my friend Chris Le Bihan at his bronze medal victory.  Way to go Chris!!

Shooting Ski Cross can be fun and exhilarating...there is always a ton of faced paced action, airs and competitor jams.  Sometimes the conditions or venue rules can make it more difficult to get the perfect shot.    I remember at the Vancouver Olympics the photographers had to all shoot from one area at the bottom and we were aways competing for the best spot to shoot from.  We had to use really long lenses to get close to the action.

For the men there was great conditions – warm sunlight on the skiers and shadowed cool backgrounds.  These elements created some wonderful colour contrast to the images and really gave the subject impact.  When the sun is shining its also much easier to freeze the action with fast shutter speeds and reasonably low ISO settings.  The women were a different story, it was foggy and snowing really hard out.   I remember very wet snow and having to constantly be cleaning off my lens and camera.  Many photographers just gave up trying to shoot because of all of the condensation.  A life saver in these conditions is a garbage bag or protective lens/camera gear to keep out the wetness and lots of dry lens cleaning cloths.

Subscribe for Updates and Photography Tips

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
All photography and content herin is Copyright © Kristian Bogner.  All Rights Reserved.  Images may not be copied or used without express written content by Kristian Bogner.

Subscribe for Updates and Photography Tips

  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.
All photography and content herin is Copyright © Kristian Bogner.  All Rights Reserved.  Images may not be copied or used without express written content by Kristian Bogner.
error: Content is protected !!
linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram